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Ambassador Program

Summary of Program

The Student Ambassador Program provides an opportunity for students to study and solve the issues of urban and regional growth right here in the Lowcountry.  Via a 3 year, credit-bearing course sequence, sophomore students will begin learning about the major policy issues facing the region.  Then, under the guidance of faculty and community members, these students will work with nonprofits, local governments, and the private sector to actually contribute solutions to these problems.  During the junior and senior years, students will perfect their professional skills by participating in small workshops, interning in local agencies, and working closely with a community mentor.

Benefits of participation

  • Give back to the local community by helping to solve local and regional problems.
  • Apply the knowledge that you are learning in your many classes.
  • Develop your professional portfolio as well as your skills in community engagement and leadership.
  • Gain valuable work experience, under the supervision of both faculty and community mentors.
  • Network with and be mentored by successful community leaders.
  • Make lifelong connections with a small group of students who share interest in solving the problems generated by urban growth and economic change

Structure of Program and Student Learning Outcomes

(Year 1) Sophomore Year

Students take URST 250 (1 credit) in the fall and URST 251 (2 credits) in the spring

These learning outcomes are pegged to lower-levels of knowledge, as drawn from Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge.  They are meant to assess foundational knowledge.

  1. Identify and explain the importance of at least one issue facing the community
  2. Identify significant actors in each of the sectors (civic, philanthropic, and business) and describe their role relative to the community issue selected.
  3. Describe relationships and decision-making processes that exist across the three sectors.

(Year 2) Junior Year

Students take URST 350 (1 credit) in the fall and URST 351 (2 credits) in the spring

These learning outcomes are pegged to middle-range levels of knowledge, as drawn from Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge.  They are meant to assess the ability of students to use and apply knowledge in different contexts, as well as their growing ability to assess knowledge

  1. Perform 5 specific skills related to communication with diverse constituencies in the Charleston region
  2. Evaluate communication strategies with urban communities
  3. Identify and use professional networks to advance a policy goals
  4. Conduct an in-depth, applied policy analysis
  5. Assess urban policy initiatives at micro- and macro- levels

 (Year 3) Senior Year

Students take URST 450 (3 credits) in the fall

These learning outcomes are pegged to higher levels of knowledge, as drawn from Bloom’s taxonomy of knowledge.  They are meant to assess the ability of students to solve problems and evaluate knowledge, as well as a final check on foundational knowledge.

  1. Select, define, and appropriately use at least three concepts
  2. Solve real-world problems or issue that they encounter in their internships
  3. Evaluate the issues and solutions proposed by their peers.

 Admissions Criteria 

  • Have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.3.
  • Be entering your sophomore year (students are admitted for the fall semester of their sophomore year).
  • Commit to 3 years of participation in the program, with up to three credits received for each year of participation.
  • Complete the program application, and submit it along with all noted documents to the Urban Studies Program Director. 
  • Participants will be notified by August 1 regarding acceptance into this program.